compression socks

  • How to choose between open toe & closed toe compression socks and stockings

    So you’re shopping for compression and you notice different labels & categories for open-toe and closed toe products. Does the label have you stumped? Don’t worry - it’s a common question we receive from compression wearers both new and old at Rejuva.

    In this video, I break down highlights of each style and key takeaways for deciding which of the two options are right for you. If you can’t watch, read on for a recap of highlights below.

    CLOSED TOE COMPRESSION STOCKINGS

    Like you might guess from the name, these cover the toes just like traditional socks or hosiery you’d buy at the store. Offering full foot coverage, closed toe items are ideal for frequent wearers of closed toed shoes and instances where you don’t want to have to wear another sock or stocking over your support garment. Closed toe compression thigh highs and pantyhose are especially great for colder months when seeking added warmth. I love pairing them with a skirt or dress just like you would normal tights for some added flair in fall and winter. These closed styles are also great for those who don’t want to “fuss” with any rolling or bunching that could occur with improper fit or donning of an open-toed garment.

    When-To-Wear-Closed-Toe-Compression-RejuvaHealth

     

    OPEN TOE COMPRESSION STOCKINGS

    While most people are familiar with traditional closed toe stockings, few know exactly what open-toe implies as it relates to compression. An important point to note is that open-toe garments are NOT the same as footless ones. There’s actually a big difference! Whereas a footless garment ends just below the ankle, an open-toe garment will extend past the entire ankle and heel, over the entire arch of the foot, and up to the base of the toes. This is an important design feature for wearers with advanced conditions along with those targeting swelling in the foot and ankle region. Because this style ends right behind the toes, it’s a great option for summer months & times when you’re seeking extra footwear flexibility (i.e. sandals anyone?).

    When-To-Wear-Open-Toe-Compression-RejuvaHealth

    Open-toe outfit tip for women: Try pairing sheer nude open toe thigh highs like these with a maxi dress and sandals. No one will know you’re wearing full-length compression!

    RH-Pinterest-Open-Toe-Inspo

    In addition to footwear flexibility, open toe compression stockings are ideal for wearers with toe conditions like ingrown nails, bunions, open sores, etc. If you need to wear an open toe for conditions like these but also want to wear a closed toe shoe, try layering your open-toe compression knee high under a pair of normal cotton ankle socks. This will give you the coverage needed for inside shoes without binding sore tootsies.

    Tip for putting on open toe items: Be sure to pull the end of the garment all the way past the ball of your foot and to the base of your toes. Don’t leave the end of it in the arch of your foot. Doing so may causing bunching and discomfort in your arch.

    Still a little confused? Try following the flow chart below for which style may be best for you.

    How to choose between open toe & closed toe compression socks and stockings
  • Compression Stockings 101: Q&A with a Vein Specialist

    So you have to wear compression socks or stockings? You’re not alone. Thousands of people have been in your shoes. And yet despite this – support legwear remains a topic clouded by confusion & misinformation. Who should wear it? What’s it used for? And how do you know which garment’s right for you?

    All too often, we hear stories of doctors giving the compression suggestion with no guidance beyond that. Is that something you experienced? If so, he probably scribbled an illegible suggestion on a pad & sent you on your way with little beyond that. Suddenly, in simply trying to follow his orders, you’re confronted with an overwhelming array of options, sizes, support levels, and styles.

    Or maybe a doctor didn’t tell you to wear compression. Maybe you’re healthy & think compression isn’t something you need. Do you ever travel? Sit or stand for long periods? Considering becoming pregnant? Or have a family history of varicose veins? If so, then compression may be something you should consider.

    Fortunately, regardless of your situation – there are people & resources to help. We teamed up with vein specialist Dr Bunke-Paquette, MD, FACPh to get her pro answers and insights to a few of the most common compression questions. Check out our exclusive interview & read on for some more of her  top tips and answers to our most commonly asked questions.

     

    :

     

    Click HERE to download a PDF version of this information. 

     

    Compression Stockings 101 - Tips from a Vein Specialist

     

    Who’s the pro? 

    Dr. Bunke-Paquette, MD, FACPh specializes in minimally invasive outpatient procedures for a variety of venous conditions. Board-certified & fellowship trained in Venous & Lymphatic Medicine, she was the first physician in the United States to complete fellowship training supported by the American College of Phlebology. In addition to directing her practice at La Jolla Vein Care, she’s a Volunteer Clinical Instructor of Surgery at UCSD School of Medicine, member of the Scripps Ximed Medical Group & VA Medical Center. Dr. Bunke-Paquette is also physician & scientist actively leading award-winning clinical research studies. For more information on Dr. Bunke & her practice, visit mailto:http://lajollaveincare.com/doctors/

    Google+

2 Item(s)