Compression

  • Footless Compression Leggings: Fashion vs. Medical, Key Features & How to Find your Perfect Pair

    When I began wearing compression in 2008, I had to wear a stocking that covered my full leg due to the location of my DVT. Since it extended up my calf to behind my knee, a sock didn’t provide enough length to manage the symptoms I was experiencing. At the time, thigh highs & pantyhose were my only option – two hosiery styles I didn’t often wear.

    Despite this, I dutifully wore the two alternating between them depending on my outfit & the weather. Their function was amazing, but they were tricky to integrate into my clothing routine. Living in California, I frequently wear sandals. While open toe styles helped me do this, I was sometimes still embarrassed for the piece of their foot that extended past my pant cuff.

    As my condition healed & symptoms improved, I began seeking ways to continue wearing compression without feeling like it was so obvious to others. Leggings were becoming especially popular with the growth of brands like Lululemon & the birth of the “athleisure” movement. To feel like I was keeping up with this, I started cutting the feet off my pantyhose. Ultimately this personal trick was the inspiration behind the development of our footless leggings.

    Since we introduced our first solid black footless version of them a few years ago, they’ve quickly become our best-selling style. To continue offering wearers different options for different needs, we’ve since added a few variations of this original variation. To help you decide whether any or one of these footless leggings is right for you, here’s some added info on their respective features & answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about footless garments.

    Q: What’s the difference between something like a Spanx fashion or Nike sport compression legging & a Rejuva wellness compression legging?

    A: Many brands like Spanx have fantastic fashion leggings that advertise compression for added slimming benefits. I myself have some of these (and love them) but there’s a very important differentiation between them. Most compression leggings you see advertised in mainstream athletic or department stores are simply elastic clothes that squeeze parts of the body in uniform ways to suck in & flatten common trouble areas like the bum, upper thigh or tummy. This can offer a sensation of being held-in or supported but they do not contain the specific type of FDA registered, carefully-measured and controlled compression that comes in medically conscious versions like Rejuva’s.

    For graduated compression to have its true circulation enhancing effects, a specific decreasing amount of compression must be applied from the ankle to the knee and above. Special medical knitting machines are required to do this along with special testing to confirm the compression is just right. These garments are held to different standards than fashion & sport variations. In fact, wearing an extremely tight compression pant or legging that doesn’t have graduated compression can actually have the opposite effect on the leg’s circulation. By squeezing in a uniform or reverse way it can impede normal circulation

    How to tell the difference between copmression leggings

    If you’re unsure of a garments’ compression type (i.e. whether it’s uniform or true graduated) one hint is to check material composition. Non-medical, unregistered fashion or sport variations typically contain a nylon/spandex mix with 5-6% spandex. By comparison, something like a Rejuva legging has nearer 23-25% spandex. This larger proportion of spandex is required to exert the degree of pressure required of effective medical compression. It’s also what makes getting into a Rejuva compression legging trickier than a Spanx version. Real graduated compression should be noticeably firm in the ankle region.

    Q: Who can wear footless compression leggings?

    A: People seeking relief from swelling & discomfort often use footless compression leggings. We have wearers who use them for things ranging from preventative reasons like standing or sitting for long periods (hair stylists, retail associates, restaurant staff, hotel employees, road or desk warriors) to medical conditions like clots, POTs, autoimmune disorders, edemas. It really varies.

    Leggings with health & beauty benefits

    Q: Who should NOT wear footless compression leggings?

    A: If you have moderate to severe venous insufficiency or edema or are recovering from a surgery, talk to your doctor to ensure this style’s right for you. In certain advanced cases, compression with a full foot may be recommended.

    Q: You mention sometimes a full foot is recommended. Why?

    A: The leg’s vascular system starts in the foot. Giving that area a hug of support along with the ankle captures all the veins & valves that begin in that lowest region. This is why we recommend positioning the bottom of your legging to cover your ankle as much as possible when you put them on. Do this by pulling the garment below your anklebone as you apply them. Also watch to ensure they don’t creep up during the day. Unintended creep up the calf can cause your ankles to swell via incorrect positioning.

    Q: What features are unique to the Rejuva legging I may not see in a fashion or sport legging?

    A:   There are a few. First, to achieve their firm graduated compression they’re knit in a way sometimes feels like thinly ribbed finish. This is an issue of functionality & required to achieve their opacity. Personally, I barely notice it but we have had people ask about it before so it’s something I like to give an extra heads up on. They’re not perfectly flat like a cotton legging.

    Second, they contain side panels on the side of the torso reminiscent of an equestrian pant. This is also a functional feature. Our first version of this item didn’t have those & it resulted in an extremely tight bum region. Without extra room for the tush, the first generation leggings were susceptible to a plumber’s crack look when sitting or bending over. I prefer not having to worry about adjusting my pants as I go about my day (and exposing my bum!) so added this extra space in our second generation.

    Lastly, they’re more work to get into than a fashion or sport legging. This is another feature of most graduated compression. Be patient when putting them on the first time & be sure to do so from a sitting position. It’s worth it!

    Rejuva compression legging features

    Q: What’s the best way to put them on?

    A: Do not bunch them up like you would a cotton sock or legging. This concentrates the compression & will make them impossible to get on. Instead, keep them laid out flat on the floor. Sit down & begin sliding ONE foot in first. Slowly pull that leg over your foot & heel bit by bit. As you gather more fabric on the other side of your heel, start inching the leg up your calf. Don’t go all the way up above your knee or it will be tough to get on the other leg. Repeat the same lower half of the leg on your remaining side. Once knee high on both, then continue slowly pulling up the remainder of the garment over the thighs. After pulling up to your waist, hold the waistband out & slide your hand palm facing out down your thigh, pulling the garment up to flatten & adjust. This is my secret trick for getting them positioned just right! Ensure the crotch is all the way up to your groin to avoid them slipping down through your day. If they aren’t pulled up properly from the start, they can become a drag (literally).

    Q: What’s the difference between a footless & stirrup Rejuva legging?

    A: The only difference between the footless & stirrup Rejuva leggings is an added piece of material connected to the end of the leg that wraps around the arch of the foot. The leg & top portions of the two versions are identical.

    The purpose of this stirrup is to hold the legging securely down over the ankle & prevent it from creeping up. By doing this it can eliminate the need to adjust the bottom of the garment through the day. From a functional perspective this lends added support to foot and ankle veins (similar to an open-toed garment) while still leaving the toes and heel open. It can also provide a feel-good hug to the arch. From a fashion perspective, this enables wearers to wear open toe & open heel shoes. I love how stirrups stay put when layered under longer socks or boots.

    Rejuva stirrup legging features

    Q: Are Rejuva leggings available in 20-30 mmHg?

    A: Not yet. This is something we’ve been working on for a long time but haven’t yet been able to get just right. Since we want them to be absolutely perfect for you, we’re continuing our product development quest. Be assured, it’s definitely something we’re prioritizing & working actively upon.

    In the meantime, one thing to note about our current 15-20 mmHg leggings is that they are produced to land on the highest side of that support range. For that reason, many 20-30 mmHg wearers are often pleasantly surprised by their firm support. If you’re a 20-30 mmHg wearer concerned as to whether you would get adequate compression from them, I’d suggest giving them a try. If they’re not quite right, just let us know within 30 days and we’ll help you find something that’s a better match.

  • Wearing Compression Stockings in Cold Weather: FAQs + Seasonal Tips

    Cooling air, shorter days, and the arrival of holiday decor: signals of fall’s arrival and the weather changes that accompany it. With this change in weather, come changes in wardrobe. For compression wearers, this sparks a different set of questions than those wearers consider in warmer months. Some of the most frequent we’ve been hearing at Rejuva are:

    • Which items are best to layer under pants?
    • Can I wear a compression legging with a sock together?
    • What are the warmest styles?

    These thoughtful questions are also complimented by style considerations. What finishes look best with this seasons’ trends?

    I know, because I too asked many of these when I started wearing compression. I’m not a doctor, but I’ve now worn compression for approaching 8 years (eeks!). Having had this personal experience combined with the benefit of speaking to countless customers via email or phone, we’ve discovered many of the answers along the way.

    So without further ado ... Here’s our take on answers to these common fall questions.

    Q: Which compression stockings are best to layer under pants?

    A: The answer to this depends on a few personal preferences & needs. Since knee highs are pretty intuitive to pair with pants, most wearers asking this are looking for a thigh high or pantyhose. In that case, I personally suggest thigh highs over pantyhose when seeking a full-length solution.

    Two key benefits I find with this [thigh high] style are that it avoids the added material layer around the tummy/bum plus quicker bathroom breaks. Most often the silicone thigh bands that hold them up cannot be seen under pants. As a disclaimer, I do find some lightweight fabrics in skinny leg cuts can reveal a bit of a bump where the elastic squeezes in that soft part of the upper thigh. Typically in my experience though, this bump isn’t significant enough for others to notice. If the upper thigh area is of special concern or sensitivity to you, then consider this when choosing between the two styles. Wearing pantyhose will eliminate this possibility under pants but also add an extra layer.

    Once you’ve narrowed down cut, next consideration is finish. In fall/winter, many of our wearers opt for an opaque pair in black. The benefit of this over a sheer is a little added warmth + durability. In the case you want something more natural looking that can be worn under a pair of distressed denim jeans (like below) or an ankle crop style, opt for a sheer in natural like this one. I find no one even notices it when peeking through the ankle area or knee.

    Rejuva-Best-Compression-Stockings-for-Wearing-Under-Pants

    Q: How about Rejuva leggings – can those be worn under pants?

    A: More recently, we’ve received a few calls asking whether our Rejuva leggings could be worn under pants. The answer is yes, but with a few considerations & prospective drawbacks. Our leggings were designed to be opaque and wearable on a stand-alone basis. As such, they’re thicker than most pantyhose & thigh highs. This is no problem if worn beneath looser, wider leg styles but may prove less than ideal under slimmer cut items. Personally, I prefer wearing our leggings on a stand-alone basis with a tunic or long sweater and not underneath pants as seen below.

    Q: Can I wear a compression sock WITH a compression legging?

    A: Sure. You could pair a compression knee high with a compression legging.We’re heard of this specifically used by some lymphedema therapists in cases where one garment alone doesn’t provide adequate support to combat the swelling through the entire lower body (toe to belly button). One thing to keep in mind when doing so is that compression layered atop compression will add to the pressure exerted on your leg. So if you layer a 15-20 mmHg sock WITH a 15-20 mmHg legging, your calf may be getting nearer 30 mmHg of pressure in that region. For some this may be firmer than desired. For others, it might feel great. As with all compression, listen to your body. Discomfort will often signal if the combo isn’t quite for you. Your doctor or therapist is also a great resource for a case-specific question like this.

    Rejuva-How-to-Relieve-Leg-Swelling-with-Compression

    Q: What are the warmest styles for colder weather?

    A: Most opaque styles are great for colder weather. I love opaque, black pantyhose like this for converting skirts & dresses into more winter-friendly gear & cozy socks like these for inside of ski & snow boots. Some brands also offer styles knit from Merino Wools, a favorite fabric of outdoor adventurers. One item I especially love for cool-weather casualwear this fall is a stirrup legging. The small stirrup helps keep the legging down around the arch of the foot, hugging the ankle with support & making sure the bottom of the legging doesn’t creep up underneath socks or boots. This fall, I’ve been taking long knit socks and slouching them down over my stirrup leggings for a little extra texture and warmth. Loving how they look here also paired with a chunky knit scarf.

    Rejuva-Leggings-with-Hidden-Health-Benefits

    How do you wear compression in cold months? Show us by tagging @rejuvahealth on Instagram. Something we missed? Help us fill in the gap by emailing support@rejuvahealth.com with your question.

  • DVT Awareness Month – The Ins and the Outs of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    DVT Awareness Month – The Ins and the Outs of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    DVT Awareness

    Were you or someone you love diagnosed with Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?

    If so, it can help to hear about the experience from a fellow survivor. To facilitate this we asked our REJUVA team member, Stacy, to share the details of her own DVT story and what she learned along the way. Read on for more about her story + top tips for navigating the physical & emotional components of recovery.

    Meet DVT Survivor, Stacy

    blood clot age

    I have come to know this phrase all too well. As if suffering a blood clot at the mere age of 20 wasn’t enough to make me feel like a walking dinosaur, family, friends, acquaintances, and even strangers were sure to remind me. The fact is, DVT can occur at any age and not one single individual is “too young” as they say. I mean honestly, who ever feels that they’re just the right age for such an injury? So chin up… you’re not alone and even more so, here at RejuvaHealth we’re the last ones that will throw you a dowdy pair of compression stockings and say problem solved.

    What is DVT?

    Let’s start with a quick overview of what DVT is and the risks that pose a problem to all walks of life, young and old alike. DVT is a medical condition that arises from the clotting of blood, usually in the calf or thigh, but can also occur in the pelvis area. The clotting of a deep vein extremity is particularly scary because there’s not always a lot of warning and the severity can escalate pretty quickly. This is why it’s especially important t to take care of yourself and listen to your body. A slight pain in you arm or leg may seem like nothing at first and you’ll initially think to just shake it off, however, don’t let such conditions prolong. Rather, take the initiative for further examination, as this little precautionary check-up could save your life.

    blood clot skin temperature

    What does it feel like?

    Stepping outside of the medical aspect, you may wonder what it feels like. You can read all about the signs and symptoms with a quick Google search, but I’d love to share those “feelings” on a more personal level. The pain experienced is often at first localized, but may progressively expand into other areas. Pain and swelling in the area is common, and some people, like myself, notice a drastic difference in the temperature of the skin to the touch. For example, my leg was significantly warmer near my pelvic region and ice cold at my toes. In the beginning, my leg felt as though I had merely pulled a muscle, but within a couple of hours, I had lost the ability to fully extend it and walking felt as though I was dragging an anvil. It was clear something wasn’t right and that’s the point at which I decided to seek medical attention. I would advise against following in my footsteps! Get help before it becomes a bigger problem.

    After the diagnoses, I felt like the nine days I spent recovering in the hospital had aged me 50+ years. I was released on July 3rd and tormented with the idea of celebrating the 4th in a swimsuit, as the battle wounds left on my belly from the Lovenox shots weren’t all that appealing. Not only did I feel physically a mess, but my spirits were also rattled. I was prescribed blood thinners, not knowing if I’d ever stop taking them, and was destined to draw blood every week to keep track of my INR (International Normalized Ratio), or as I like to refer to it, the rate at which I bled. In addition to this, I was on a restricted diet, and for the first time in my life my doctor told me to stay away from greens and cranberry juice. Yes, you read that correctly! As it turns, high levels of Vitamin K can alter the way warfarin works, making it difficult to effectively prevent blood clots. It took a while to get used the changes, but eventually I found a happy medium, where I could still get a taste of my all time favorite Brussels sprouts, and also test within range on my weekly INR.

    warfarin vitamin k

    What are some of the things about DVT recovery people don’t talk about?

    A part from the lifestyle changes mentioned above, I also noticed some interesting changes in my body. While taking warfarin I gained some weight, which mostly was attributed to the change in my diet and the inability to workout given the injury. In the search for recipe ideas, I came across “The Coumadin Cookbook,” which I thought worth sharing as it helped keep me on a more healthy diet.

    I also noticed my hair consistency changed, and it regrettably wasn’t for the better. I noticed I lost larger than normal amounts in the shower and in my brush. My hair was thinning right before my eyes, and it was alarming, as no one had mentioned this side effect of warfarin. Are you experiencing something similar? There are many different thickening agents out there, and while I encourage you to do your research, I found the brand Nioxin was what I preferred, as the minty smell wasn’t overpowering.

    One weird, but also really interesting observation was that the pain in my leg was significantly affected by the weather. If a drastic change in the weather was on the upcoming forecast, I’d feel incredible amounts of pressure near the site of my clot. I had brought this up with several different doctors, but none of them had ever heard of anything similar from other patients. Seeming I had gone mad, I turned to DVT support groups online, like Dailystrength.org, and found that just like me, other people were discovering anomalies happening in their own bodies, many of which were also unexplained by their physicians.

    What’s the deal with compression stockings?

    rejuva compression socks

    Lastly, I can’t talk about DVT without mentioning, drumroll please… the dreaded COMPRESSION STOCKINGS! On top of all the physical and emotional changes, you’re forced to change your wardrobe and it isn’t quite that easy. No matter where you live, compression stockings don’t ever seem to fit in with the summer or winter fashion trends. However, I want to send along encouragement, because I found that compression stockings were my saving grace. As much as I absolutely despised the look and feel of the orthopedic ones I originally owned, they kept my Post-Thrombotic Syndrome (PTS) to a minimum and had me on the road to recovery, with a reduced chance of developing a new clot. And hey, that’s the whole reason our Founder, Kelsey, created RejuvaHealth. To help you find fashionable compression stockings that make you feel GREAT, as well also help combat leg pain and fatigue. So don’t be a stranger, we have several different options that will get you through a hot summer day or provide a little extra warmth on a cold winter night.

    Whether you need some style advice, or have a specific question about the fit, reach out to us - we’re all here for you. We also enjoy sharing war stories and hearing more from our fellow DVT-ers personal experiences. Until next time – take care of those legs.

  • Compression Tips For Travel

    Traveling over the holiday? Check out what Kelsey has to say about traveling in style all while keeping your legs and feet healthy.

    Products Mentioned: RejuvaWear Indigo Blue Leggings - http://bit.ly/1BljP5B

    Chevron RejuvaSocks - http://bit.ly/1xeNNJp

    Sheer Floral Pantyhose - http://bit.ly/13R9cNd

    CoolMax Khaki Socks - http://bit.ly/1wzbMxR

    If you have any questions regarding our products or how to pack compression for travel, send us an email: support@rejuvahealth.com

    Compression Tips For Travelers

  • Effective (and Weird) Ways to Recycle Your Pantyhose This Spring

    Tired of just throwing away pantyhose after they wear out? Interested in getting a little more use out of them? US TOO! We’ve discovered that together we can help the Earth and prevent the immediate landfill disposal of compression garments by taking a different perspective on recycling.  We’ve listed a few, effective repurposing tips that are perfect for using around the house this spring.

     

    Dish Scrubber

    This trick is easy.  Start by bunching up a clean, old pair of pantyhose, adding a small amount of liquid dishwashing detergent and warm water, and begin scrubbing away at your nonstick cookware.  They can also provide for a great everyday scrubber for dishes.  Simply cut out the toe of the garment and cover an old sponge. You’re now ready to wash away!

    Secure trash bags

    If you’ve ever had issues with the trash bag liner slipping down into the trashcan, this is a perfect solution for you.  With an old pair of pantyhose, you can firmly secure the top of the garbage bag to your trashcan by taking the elastic waistband of the garment and tying it around the top part of the trashcan.

    Dust under the fridge

    Tie an old pair of pantyhose to a wired clothes hanger, and then secure it with a rubber band.  The pantyhose will help pick up the dust by simply doing a quick sweep underneath those hard-to-reach places, like the refrigerator.

    Prevent soil erosion in houseplants

    It’s a great feeling seeing how well your house plant is thriving and surviving! However, we all know the plant eventually outgrows its pot, forcing you to transfer it to a more comfortable abode. Use a pair of pantyhose as a liner for the new pot.  This will allow for excess water to flow out without dehydrating the rest of the soil.

    Keep deer out of your garden

    Spring brings new life to the natural world around us.  As much as we love it, the animals typically don’t mind their manners while feasting away at the blossoming garden you put so much work in to.  Prevent this from happening by filling the foot portion of pantyhose with human hair and placing it around the outer parts of the garden. The smell is very unappetizing to deer, preventing them from coming back for seconds.  Over time, the hair begins to lose its scent – be sure to refill the pantyhose with new hair once every week.

    Cover a kids’ bug jar

    Childhood is all about those warm nights of catching fireflies in a mason jar.  Keep those magical bugs safe by covering the top of the Mason jar with an old pair of pantyhose.  Simply cut a large square from the garment, and then secure it safely to the jar with a rubber band. This will prevent you from the daunting task of cutting holes in the aluminum top.

    Test a sanded surface for snags

    Thinking of starting a new project that involves woodwork?  Test the surface of the wood by placing an old pair of pantyhose over your hand and running the garment along the surface.  If the nylon catches at any point, the wood still needs to be sanded.  Continue the test until the garment smoothly runs along the surface.

    Clean your pool

    Want a more effective way to skim the debris off the surface of your pool water?  An old pair of pantyhose serves as the perfect self-made pool net.  Simply cut off the leg of the garment and attach it to a pool skimmer basket.  This will help catch the pesky dirt particles and hairs that typically clog the pool’s filter unit.

    Make a paint strainer

    Use an old pair of pantyhose to filter and remove the lumps of paint that form in an old paint can.  It’s as simple as cutting the pantyhose then stretching the fabric over a clean bucket or other recyclable.  Hold the garment in place with a rubber band or the waistband.  Check to see if the garment is secure then slowly pour the paint over the piece of pantyhose and into the paint bucket.

    Buff your shoes

    Bring out the shine in your freshly polished shoes by buffing them with a medium-length strip of pantyhose. It works so well, you may retire that chamois cloth for good.

    Keep your hairbrush clean

    There is nothing pleasant about cleaning out a hairbrush covered in hair.  Cut a piece of the pantyhose in unison to the shape of your brush, the push it through the bristles of a clean hairbrush.  Next time you go to clean the hair off, simple pull up the pantyhose for easy removal.   Replace it with a clean strip.

    Hold mothballs or potpourri

    Looking for an easy way to store mothballs in your closet or to make sachets of potpourri to keep in your dresser drawers? Pour either ingredient into the toe section of your recycled nylons, knot off the contents, and then cut off the remaining hose. If you plan to hang up the mothballs, be sure to leave several inches of material before cutting.

     

     

    Sources:  Reader’s Digest

  • On Your Mark...Jet Set...GO!

    Traveling can be a very transportal experience — literally.  Regardless of where you are headed, your trip begins the second you walk out of your front door… so, why are you still wearing your beat-up sweats to the airport? To make your adventure feel all the more special (and save space in your suitcase!),your traveling outfit should be as put-together as what you're going to be wearing on your trip. No need to sacrifice comfort, though — there are plenty of strategically cozy pieces that are mega stylish, as well. Now, put down those shearling boots and step away from the velour: We've put together a mini lookbook to satisfy your traveling needs.

    International

    1

    Cozy, comfy pants and loose V-Neck, a bomber jacket, a light scarf, RejuvaHealth’s travel friendly knee highs, the perfect rollaway, and a classic pair of flats – this outfit has the potential to take you anywhere, while at the same time keeping the changing climates (and cultures) in mind.

     

     

    Domestic

     2

    A light carry on is a must, a pair of boyfriend jeans, a soft striped shirt, a lightweight jacket, converse sneakers and RejuvaHealth’s travel friendly knee highs --  this outfit is just enough preparation for some kind of delay (knock on wood).  It comfortable yet still cute enough to wear for two days!  What better than way to show your patriotism with some stripes, converse and a (less obnoxious) red jacket?!

    Here are some helpful travel tips:

    • Always pack the essentials in your carry on – toothbrush, change of clothes, face wipes, deodorant – you can never trust estimated time of arrivals...for you OR your luggage.
    • Wear compression socks – during a long flight, your legs can get restless and achy from the poor circulation you’re getting from sitting too long (not to mention the altitude).  This is an easy and preventive measure for health issues that can be sparked when flying.
    • Bring some type of entertainment (I.e. a book, headphones, i-pad).  The flight magazines get boring after a while – trust me.
    • Choose your seat ASAP – the instant you book your flight, choose your seat.  Flights are becoming more crowded now and the only thing worse than getting stuck beside a smelly person is getting stuck in between two smelly people.

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